FORGET HOT GIRL SUMMER, IT’S A THERMAL SPRING

FORGET HOT GIRL SUMMER, IT’S A THERMAL SPRING

by Stella Hughes
4 min
© Trapstar

After the last two years of social distancing, people want to be touched – and apparently, want everyone else to know about it. Trickling in over the last year or so, we’ve seen heat reactive technology and thermal print creep more and more into clothing, and we’re not mad at it. It’s the same sort of vibe as a mood ring, or colour-changing mug, and we’re surprised it took this long to warm up in the fashion world. From sneakers to puffers, we’re taking a look at some of the best heat-reactive garms on the market.

 HEAT REACTIVE AIR JORDAN 1 MID

Last year saw the rise of Jordan Brand‘s Air Jordan 1, which prompted Jordan Brand to experiment with design and materials. Enter the heat reactive style, which coupled a classic base with the vibrancy of its reactive rear half. A perfect blend of old and new, this piece saw heels, collar flaps and tongue tags all coated in a heat-reactive material that shifts shades from blue to yellow and green in response to light and temperature.

STONE ISLAND SS22

For SS22, Stone Island went all-out experimental, and in celebration of 40 years of innovative fabric use we saw a colourful, technologically considered collection. Their take on thermal print is their Heat Reactive Lamy fabric, which transitions from yellow to orange and light blue to bluette, depending on temperature. 

The brand’s link up with Supreme also saw a series of thermosensitive rain jackets being produced, coming in blues, pinks, blacks and yellows to name a few. Find these retailing for around the £2k mark on StockX.

LUXURY

Luxury brands are taking note too, with heat reactive technology being one of the design tropes taken from streetwear in the two’s seemingly growing amalgamation. Louis Vuitton weighs in on the game with a monogrammed heat-reactive puffer jacket which looks undeniably cosy, while MCQ keeps things (hypothetically) cool with a heat-reactive gilet.

TRAPSTAR PUFFER

Trapstar is another London-based brand taking advantage of Thermal-print Spring. Seen on Slawn here, the brand’s signature blue puffer jacket reacts to the heat of your body, making for some interesting handprint design opportunities, if we say so ourselves.

SYNDICAL CHAMBER DRESS

Whilst not heat-reactive, Syndical Chamber were instrumental in propelling thermal print into the spotlight with their body-conscious, form-celebrating prints. This one recalls infrared technology, and has inspired whole thermal-print ranges from other fast-fashion brands.

HILLSIDE

A personal favourite of artist Slawn, Hillside is an emerging brand pioneering the heat-reactive space with their ‘Reactive Loop’ trousers – which were worn by Skepta back in 2020.

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