PUMA took over New York Fashion Week to resurrect the Mostro

PUMA took over New York Fashion Week to resurrect the Mostro

by Robyn Pullen
4 min

The era of the PUMA Mostro is back, and it’s as monstrous as ever (in the best way possible). Last night, the sportswear and lifestyle giant returned to New York Fashion Week to say “Welcome To The Amazing Mostro Show.” Resurrecting its iconic Mostro sneaker in bold, iconic fashion, PUMA transformed New York’s Park Avenue Armory into a fairground on psychedelics. Guests were welcomed first into an entrance decorated with giant, black spikes which covered the walls (reminiscent of the Mostro’s signature spiked sole), before stepping into a show space that was giving fairground meets rave.

Life-size ferris wheels and roller-coasters filled the space, with white and red light bouncing off their imposing metal structures, revealing upon closer inspection that legs hung from the seats of the rides – Mostro’s dangling from their feet. After taking their seats, PUMA’s guests saw the show-space lit up with beams of projected light; heard the reverberating bass of Eartheater filled the space; and witnessed the ferris wheel rapidly begin to swing: PUMA’s “Amazing Mostro Show” had started. 

The first look revealed on PUMA’s runway was an all black, oversized puffer jacket and shorts, emblazoned with the iconic leaping PUMA cat logo. As the brand’s Global Creative Director, Heiko Desens, told us after the show, the collection was intended to be for a broader audience, undefined by gender-binding silhouettes and styles. Oversizing played a lot into PUMA’s intention to keep its clothing un-gendered. As Desens explained, “anyone can wear this look.”

1 / 5
2 / 5
3 / 5
4 / 5
5 / 5
previous arrow
next arrow
 

This was followed by looks in similarly relaxed fits, like utility style, hooded sets and crushed velvet dresses and t-shirts reading “MACHT’S MIT QUALITAT,” German for “Made With Quality.” A series of matching sets, seen in reflective white hooded iterations and velvet black sets with grey detailing, continued the show, accessorised with bags and caps, like the giant football-shaped silver bag carried by one mode. 

Despite the vibrating music, flashing lights, and captivating fashion on the runway, it was hard to miss the shoes: all Mostros. PUMA’s archived silhouette was brought back in exaggerated, futuristic styles, designed out of a 3D-printed flexible fabric. White knee-high boots were contrasted against the classic Mostro sneaker silhouette in red and electric yellow and even white mesh, all with the iconic Mostro spikes detailing the sole. 

As the bassy music increased in volume, clothing transformed, becoming looser, sleeker, and more avant garde. A cape-like, sleeveless, hooded jacket worn over a mesh dress blended traditionally feminine and masculine styles, followed by Alex Consani herself walking in a burgundy hooded top, layered under a draped jumpsuit with loose-fitting sleeves.

1 / 4
2 / 4
3 / 4
4 / 4
previous arrow
next arrow
 

A detail that was easy to miss but added so much to the show was the FX makeup applied to models’ ears and foreheads, transforming them into Mostro demons, like the ones seen in PUMA’s Mostro campaign in January. Makeup artist Isamaya Ffrench explained to us backstage that, “the show is all about the Mostro trainer, which is this monstrous, spikey trainer, so some of the models have black glossy horns or monster ears that we’ve pierced to make them look more punk.” 

Even more light and colour entered the show space, seen in a pair of bold psychedelic prints accompanied by purple handle bags flashed by, followed by see-through bags in the same silhouette, filled with bright pink and yellow PUMA merch. Finally, the collection was brought to its finalé by a mesh, white catsuit with grey panelling, accessorised with a glittering, diamond-encrusted biker-helmet.

Speaking with Heiko Densin after the show, he explained that the message behind the collection is fluidity. “We really want this fluid styling to be the key message,” he said, explaining that every garment was designed, styled, and cast with the knowledge that it could be worn by anyone. There are no rules to PUMA’s Mostro collection; wear it how you want to.

1 / 5
2 / 5
3 / 5
4 / 5
5 / 5
previous arrow
next arrow
 

Main image credit: Robyn Pullen for CULTED ©

More on Culted

See: Mahalia on PUMA Suede XLs, Brit Awards & being a woman

See: Who cares about the clothes? Here are the accounts you need to follow this Fashion Month

in other news

Comment

JOIN THE CULTED COMMUNITY TO GET THE LATEST ON FASHION, ART AND CULTURE