Mugler FW24 was more than a runway show

Mugler FW24 was more than a runway show

by Robyn Pullen
3 min

For FW24, Mugler answered the question we’re faced with every fashion month: should a fashion show be a show? Creative Director, Casey Cadwallader presented his FW24 collection for Mugler last night in Paris, with a performance that featured more theatrics than some Broadway shows. With plummeting curtains, dry ice smoke, half a dozen spotlights, and drones and cameras to capture the scene, the collection almost faded in comparison to the drama of the show. (Note we said ‘almost,’ because it featured some stunning looks.)

Whilst the function of the runway show has always been to simply promote a designers’ clothes, offering buyers and press an in person preview of new collections, Mugler’s show last night was more than a preview. Much like many of the shows we see at Fashion Month nowadays, even the brand’s FW24 show space was far from an elevated runway with chairs either side. 

The show was held at the Cirque d’Hiver in Paris, an enormous venue known for hosting concerts, circuses, and even Thierry Mugler himself for the brand’s 20th anniversary show in 1995. No expense was spared for Mugler’s return to the Cirque d’Hiver in 2024, in Cadwallader’s effort to mimic the iconic event that took place there in 1995, and we have to say he held his own.

Whilst Mugler’s 1995 show at the Cirque d’Hiver saw models Naomi Campbell and Kate Moss on the runway, this season invited the likes of Alex Consani, Precious Lee, and Paloma Elsesser to walk, arguably this generation’s fiercest models. The show also employed models as more than vessels to wear the collection, but as main characters in its film of the collection too, posing into the cameras that hovered around them.

This immersive runway experience at Mugler wasn’t limited to those in attendance either. It prioritised people who weren’t able to see it in person just as much as those who were on the guest list, democratising its show in a way that we can’t help but love. By filming every moment of the event, Mugler invited the general public to experience the drama of its FW24 collection, not even just from the FROW, but literally from the middle of the runway.

Mugler ©
Mugler ©
Mugler ©
Mugler ©
Mugler ©
Mugler ©
Mugler ©
Mugler ©
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Similarly to the resurrection of the show space, Cadwallader had also looked back in time for his inspiration for the collection itself. Referencing the glamorous opulence of Mugler’s archival collections from the 1980s, this season saw daywear eschewed for evening wear, denim replaced with sheer corsetry, and Lycra swapped for leather. 

Every element of Mugler’s FW24 was dramatised and glamorised, from the show space to its models to the collection itself. Whilst the original purpose of the runway show might not have been to put on a performance like this, we don’t know what Mugler would be without it: Mugler without drama, glamour, and theatrics is not something we’d want to see.

Featured image via Mugler ©

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