HOW TO DISPOSE OF YOUR DISPOSABLE CAMERA – A FILM CAMERA GUIDE

HOW TO DISPOSE OF YOUR DISPOSABLE CAMERA – A FILM CAMERA GUIDE

by Chioma Muoneke
5min
Eddy Chen ©

Let’s face it, we’re in the midst of a vintage revival. From clothes, to music, and films and now our instagram feeds are filled with constant odes to the better times gone past. Anything and everything reminiscent of the past is in and of course with that comes the wonderfully imperfect film photography. Less than two minutes of swiping and you’ll be sure to see the notorious slide post with the almost obsessively tailored ‘film dumps’ or ‘film from [insert country visited]’, made to look like they were taken and posted without a second thought. It seems as though however, what was just a trend has become for many a hobby (and a low effort staple for the perfect instagram feed).

The obvious choice is of course the Summer disposable camera, but they yield average results at best and not to mention the effect that the plastic cameras have on the environment. If you thought that the 40 degree heatwave last week was unbearable then get ready for worse if you don’t make the switch to more sustainable photography. Film photography is in full swing and whether you’re looking to take the instagram picture of the year or you’re looking for a new hobby, we’re here to help you dispose of that disposable.Why not opt for the worthy investment of a classic 35mm camera (or 120mm if you’re feeling brave)?

The key to making that photography investment? A camera and film. The results? Superior photos in quality and the pretentious but satisfactory achievement of loading your own film and depending on the camera, being in full control of the result.

THE FILM CAMERA:
From Kendall Jenner‘s trusty (but oh-so-pricey) £1000+ point-and shoot, to the more accessible and beginner-friendly disposable wannabe a.k.a the Kodak M35, we’ve rounded up a list of some of the most popular compact point-and-shoot cameras for you to develop your film skills with.

Contax T2

Emulsive ©

We have Kendall Jenner to thank for this camera’s rise in popularity, yet before it shot to fame in 2017 after Kendall snapped a shot of Jimmy Fallon on the Tonight Show, it was known for its autofocus, auto mode and various premium manual features including flash and lenses. This camera isn’t for the weak of heart (or those looking to just hop on the trend). The steep price point of over £1000 on ebay means that this camera truly is a lifetime investment. But if the photo results are anything to go by and not to mention the sleek metal exterior, then this camera is definitely worth ditching the fiddly overpriced disposable cameras. 

Olympus (MJU ii)

Ming Thein ©


Any Olympus breed will be eyed enviously by any wannabe film enthusiasts. Known as the gateway to more professional film shots, the coveted film brand is known for its amazing photo yield and high-speed shooting and manual controls. Ask any film expert what camera to invest in and we’d be willing to bet that they will recommend an Olympus (most likely the MJU ii). This camera reigns supreme as one of the best compact point-and-shoots and all for the more reasonable prices ranging from £30 – £300 you’ll definitely be getting bang for your buck.

Canon Sureshot z135

Canon ©


Having seen this camera’s shutter speed up-close and personal it’s a wonder as to how it’s priced at the £40 – £80 range. With beautifully sharp photos, manual zoom lens and its compact yet sturdy body this camera is one that you’ll love forever and is a great alternative to the Olympus or Contax ranges.

Kodak M35

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If you want a camera that looks and feels like a disposable, with photos of the same quality then the Kodak M35 is going to be your best friend. The best thing about this camera is that it comes in a variety of candy-esque colours, which makes it the perfect gift for people who just want a fun camera with all of the bragging rights that come with owning a film camera. This is definitely the budget-friendly option at £30.

The list goes on and on, but some other cameras to focus your lenses on when hunting for your new camera should be the Yashica T4/T5 Super D, Konica Big Mini or any camera from the Olympus range. These babies can be procured from Ebay, Depop or any trusted second-hand camera shop and if the thrifting Gods are smiling down at you then you may happen upon one of these cameras for half the price. 

Once you have a camera in hand (for a reasonable price we hope) all you’ll need is some 35mm film before you point and shoot. The most universally used and beginner friendly films would of course be Kodak Gold or Kodak Colorplus. If you’re looking for more professional looking photos that work impressively in low lighting then the Kodak Portra 400 or 800 , which can be purchased from any camera shop are your best bet! The standard film camera has an automatic winding so once you’ve consulted a few youtube tutorials and stuck the film in you should be ready to embark on your analogue photography journey! “What I See” by Brooklyn Beckham 2.0 pending.

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